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Chromite

Latest News

  • Price Briefing April 6 -12

    Friday, 13 April 2018

    Global spot iodine prices tick up on tight supply, bullish sentiment; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of baddeleyite prices; China magnesia market stable while mining restrictions continue; Chinese antimony trioxide market softens amid fears of trade war; PRICING NOTICE: Extended consultation period for proposal to discontinue celestite price; Weak activity slows chemical chromite trading; foundry-grade spread increasing; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of mica prices

  • IM's March Price Movements

    Friday, 13 April 2018

    IM's monthly price movements.

  • Weak activity slows chemical chromite trading; foundry-grade spread increasing

    Wednesday, 11 April 2018

    Chinese chemical chromite buyers have been slow to return to the market after the holiday period with volatility in UG2 chrome ore potentially contributing to the hesitant attitude, while foundry chromite premiums have been increasing.

  • US private equity firm buys Prince Corp

    Tuesday, 03 April 2018

    The minerals supplier has been acquired by American Securities.

More from Latest News

Pricing News

  • Price Briefing April 6 -12

    Friday, 13 April 2018

    Global spot iodine prices tick up on tight supply, bullish sentiment; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of baddeleyite prices; China magnesia market stable while mining restrictions continue; Chinese antimony trioxide market softens amid fears of trade war; PRICING NOTICE: Extended consultation period for proposal to discontinue celestite price; Weak activity slows chemical chromite trading; foundry-grade spread increasing; PRICING NOTICE: Discontinuation of mica prices

  • IM's March Price Movements

    Friday, 13 April 2018

    IM's monthly price movements.

  • Weak activity slows chemical chromite trading; foundry-grade spread increasing

    Wednesday, 11 April 2018

    Chinese chemical chromite buyers have been slow to return to the market after the holiday period with volatility in UG2 chrome ore potentially contributing to the hesitant attitude, while foundry chromite premiums have been increasing.

  • IM prices March 2018

    Wednesday, 28 March 2018

    See article below from the April issue of Industrial Minerals magazine, for market updates on price movements in various industrial minerals. Minerals featured this month include: magnesia, titanium dioxide, chromite, graphite, zircon, lithium and andalusite.

More from Pricing News

Features

  • A rock and a hard place

    Friday, 08 September 2017

    Demand for refractory products is evolving, forcing suppliers to upgrade their offers and processes to stay ahead of the game, while Chinese-origin raw materials are appreciating on the back of supply shortages, making productions costlier, Davide Ghilotti, IM Chief Reporter, finds.

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Market Brief

Chromite is the commercial name for iron chromium oxide (FeCr2O4), a mineral containing chromium (a transition metal with multiple oxidation states) and iron oxide. In its purest form, chromite comprises chromium (Cr2O3) at 68% and iron oxide (FeO) at 32%.

 

Chromite occurs exclusively in ultramafic rocks such as dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite and serpentinite.

 

High purity deposits are rare owing to replacement by certain elements. In nature, ferrous iron tends to be partially replaced by magnesium, while chromium may be partially replaced by aluminium or ferric iron.

 

As a result, a range of chromite grades can occur in any deposit, with each grade suitable for a specific application.

 

Grades produced include metallurgical and non-metallurgical applications:

 

·         Metallurgical grade (high chromium chromite, minimum 40% Cr2O3)

·         Chemical grade (high iron chromite, 46% Cr2O3)

·         Foundry grade (low silica chromite, 45% Cr2O3)

·         Refractory grade (high aluminium chromite, 46% Cr2O3)

 

Supply

World chromite reserves are estimated to total around 7.6bn tonnes, with the majority of this located in South Africa. The country is by far the single largest holder of the world’s chromite reserves, accounting for 5.5bn tonnes (72%) – much of which is held in the Bushveld Igneous Complex.

 

Other important sources of chromite include Zimbabwe (with 12% of the world’s reserves), Kazakhstan (4%), Finland (2%), India (1%) and smaller amounts in Turkey and elsewhere.

 

World production of chrome ore totalled 23.8m. tonnes in 2008 and was dominated by South Africa (41%), followed by India (16%), Kazakhstan (15%), Turkey (8%), and Oman (3.5%).

 

Leading non-metallurgical chromite producers include:

 

Assmang – South Africa

Chromex – UK (operating in South Africa)

Cihan Group – Turkey

Dedeman Madencilik – Turkey

Eti Krom – Turkey

Marico Chrome – South Africa

Oman Chromite – Oman

Rand York Minerals – South Africa

Samancor – South Africa

Xstrata – South Africa


Markets

Ferrochrome markets consumed 93% of the chrome ore produced in 2009, with non-metallurgical markets accounting for almost all of the balance (save for 0.1% used as chromium metal).

Chemical and foundry grade chromite consumed around 3% each of total chromite production, with about 1% used in refractories.

 

Chemical grade chromite: used in leather tanning, metal finishing and wood preservatives. Also used to produce light-stable and corrosion-inhibiting pigments; in addition to paints, colour glass, and ceramic glazes.

 

Foundry grade chromite: specialist foundry sand used to produce manganese, carbon and alloy steel castings and non-ferrous metal castings. Promotes rapid solidification of castings.

 

Refractory grade chromite: used to manufacture refractory bricks used in converters and furnaces for platinum, copper and lead production, and some secondary steelmaking processes.