Magnesia features

  • April 2002

    Rare earths supply and demand - A European market focus

    01 April 2002

    China dominates the market, supplying over 85% of world demand. It has recently taken steps to increase prices through the restriction of exports and support for minimum prices by the major producers. This paper provides an overview of world supply and demand with a particular focus on the European market.

  • A mountain of rare potential - Mt Weld rare earths

    01 April 2002

    The global rare earth supply market is dominated by Chinese producers, which control around 85% of an 80,000 tpa market of rare earth oxides. Recently, the industry has undergone some structural changes, and rare earth oxides and metals are starting to find important uses in growing markets and applications, such as permanent magnets, and catalytic converters. Australia’s Lynas Corp. believes the time is right to develop its newly acquired Mt Weld site in Western Australia, and enter the global rare earth market as a major player.

  • Refined kaolin in China - Quality improvements needed to meet paper demand

    01 April 2002

    For a long time China has utilised kaolin, and the term “kaolin” is derived from the town “Kau-ling”, near the city of Jingdezhen, in Jiangxi province. This features reviews the major producers of refined kaolin in China, and although the major market is ceramics, there are signs that the paper market is rapidly developing.

  • Going underground - Czech bentonite in nuclear waste disposal

    01 April 2002

    Smectite-rich materials have found many industrial applications over the last century, such as the foundry industry, iron ore pelletisation, well drilling, and absorbents. All these uses are well established for Czech bentonites and montmorillonite clays. However, use as engineered barriers in the disposal of high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel opens the possibility of a new market for these industrial minerals. This feature reviews the sources of Czech smectite clays and explains how they can be used in underground nuclear waste repositories.

  • Another pinch of salt - European salt production

    01 April 2002

    Manufacturers live in a mutable world in which the pace of change is accelerating. There is a double need to satisfy shareholders and to address sustainable development while the general trend moves from commodity products towards speciality applications. For the European salt industry, which is suffering from endemic over capacity and negative growth, the implications for genuine sustainable development are less clear than for other industries like chemicals. Concentration is again underway.

  • Emery

    01 April 2002