Open/Close Mobile Menu Open/Close Mobile Menu

Graphite

Latest News

  • Higher steel production supports Vesuvius’ H1

    Thursday, 27 July 2017

    Rising steel output globally in the first half of 2017 supported Vesuvius’ sales to steelmakers, leading to higher profits and turnover, but rising raw material prices are a concern.

  • Imerys ups revenue, profit in H1

    Thursday, 27 July 2017

    Both divisions active in refractories, High Resistance Minerals and Energy Solutions & Specialties, returned to growth following a sluggish performance in 2016, while Ceramic Materials was weighed down by weak kaolin sales.

  • Graphite Juniors News in Brief 10 – 24 July

    Monday, 24 July 2017

    A brief roundup of notable activity in the graphite industry, with news from Great Lakes Graphite, Kibaran Resources, Alabama Graphite and Nouveau Monde Graphite.

  • Price briefing 14 – 20 July

    Friday, 21 July 2017

    Chinese graphite prices rebound following sharp decline when China scrapped export tax in January; Closure of numerous small mines in China supports ilmenite market; European producer Alteo to increase price on all speciality alumina products; Global antimony trioxide price drop; IM spodumene delisting notice

More from Latest News

Pricing News

  • Price briefing 14 – 20 July

    Friday, 21 July 2017

    Chinese graphite prices rebound following sharp decline when China scrapped export tax in January; Closure of numerous small mines in China supports ilmenite market; European producer Alteo to increase price on all speciality alumina products; Global antimony trioxide price drop; IM spodumene delisting notice

  • Chinese graphite prices rebound on output cut

    Friday, 21 July 2017

    Prices for some graphite grades in China have rebounded since the country's export tax was cancelled in January.

  • Price briefing 16-22 June

    Friday, 23 June 2017

    A severe supply shortage has lifted fused magnesia prices outside of China; Chinese flake graphite grades post uptick; spot chromite prices fall on lack of Chinese buying; baryte holds unchanged despite heavy rain storm temporarily hitting production in China; antimony trioxide prices under pressure; Chinese producers raise rare earth prices again; ilmenite trading activity slumps leading some to speculate that it could be an end to the rise in prices.

  • Chinese flake graphite grade posts price uptick

    Thursday, 22 June 2017

    Prices of large flake and high-carbon material have shown an uptick as producers are concerned with stability of supply in the wake of drought conditions and environmental controls.

More from Pricing News

Features

  • Processing: Going green

    Friday, 07 July 2017

    Although the number of industrial minerals covered by IM is far reaching and the technology required for their production often varies by sector, the mining industry is seeing increasing calls for corporate social responsibility and greener technology, particularly in light of the growing role renewable energy has to play in the everyday lives of consumers.

  • US exiting Paris Treaty not expected to impact minerals sector

    Friday, 07 July 2017

    In the wake of President Trump’s announcement that the US will be pulling out of the 2015 Paris Climate Treaty, IM looks at the significance of this move and the possible impact this will have on the industrial minerals market. By Mark Rowe

  • Junior mining: Back from the brink?

    Thursday, 26 January 2017

    Half a decade on from the collapse of the global mining boom, a rally in commodity markets last year caught many investors off guard and has created a weak but welcome tailwind for the stalled exploration industry, Rose Pengelly, IM Correspondent, finds.

  • 2016 Year in Review

    Thursday, 15 December 2016

    A round up of the year's main events in major global industrial minerals markets such as lithium, agriminerals, rare earths and titanium dioxide.

  • Graphite – The only way is up

    Thursday, 15 December 2016

    Temperature-resistant, unusually stable and unreactive, graphite is a key ingredient in refractories, lubricants, batteries, flame retardants and pencils. But oversupply has dragged the mineral’s value down to record lows and only controls on Chinese production complemented by a surge in demand from new applications can reverse its fortunes.

  • Talk From The Top: What those at the helm make of the last two years in industrial minerals markets

    Saturday, 21 May 2016

    While the majority of industrial mineral market participants are bracing themselves for another tough year, IM spoke to key industry players about adapting to current conditions and seeking out new markets.

  • India's mining industry: Challenges and potential

    Saturday, 21 May 2016

    The Indian mining industry is best described as a success story still in the making. Despite holding reserves of 89 different minerals, Shruti Salwan, IM Analyst, examines why growth in the domestic mining industry has been relatively stagnant, failing to reap the benefits of an emerging middle class.

More from Features

Market Brief

Graphite is one of most versatile of non-metallic minerals. It is one of four main natural forms of carbon along with coke, coal, anthracite and diamond. Graphite can also be manufactured synthetically, primarily via the Acheson Process which utilises lower purity carbon-bearing raw materials blended with tar pitch.

Natural graphite is produced in three commercial forms: amorphous (60-85%C), flake (>85%C) and vein (>90%C). Vein graphite is only being mined in Sri Lanka.

Graphite’s main markets are a combination of traditional industry – refractories (high temperature bricks and linings utilised in metal production, ceramics, petrochemicals and cement industries) – as well as batteries and the main anode material. Other markets include steel-making (as a recarburizer), brake-linings for vehicles and lubricants.

Natural and synthetic graphite industries operate independently and have little crossover in market share and end-uses.

Natural graphite supply

Natural graphite production was 1.1m tonnes worldwide in 2012. Of this total, flake accounted for 55%, amorphous 44% and vein 1%.

The dominance of Chinese production is the main talking point in the industry. China accounted for 79% of total world output followed by Brazil, India, North Korea and Canada. Smaller levels of production are also seen in Norway, Zimbabwe, Madagascar, Russia, Ukraine and Germany.

The natural graphite industry is going through a corrective phase following over two decades of no new supply coming on-stream.

China is focusing on controlling its sprawling domestic graphite industry and improving pollution levels and mining practices. At the same time a macro-economic push to move from lower value exports to producing value added products is expected to see less graphite concentrate destined for export and higher production of downstream products such as spherical graphite and battery anode materials.

The 2011 exploration boom

The emergence of electric vehicles (EV) and the potential boom in lithium-ion battery demand has buoyed interest in graphite’s role as a major battery raw material. This led to an exploration boom between 2011 and 2012 which saw over 70 new companies being established, predominately focused on exploration in Canada.

Towards the end of 2012, the rush slowed as investment from the capital markets dried up.

Graphite is one of most versatile of non-metallic minerals. It is one of four main natural forms of carbon along with coke, coal, anthracite and diamond. Graphite can also be manufactured synthetically, primarily via the Acheson Process which utilises lower purity carbon-bearing raw materials blended with tar pitch.

Natural graphite is produced in three commercial forms: amorphous (60-85%C), flake (>85%C) and vein (>90%C). Vein graphite is only being mined in Sri Lanka.

Graphite’s main markets are a combination of traditional industry – refractories (high temperature bricks and linings utilised in metal production, ceramics, petrochemicals and cement industries) – as well as batteries and the main anode material. Other markets include steel-making (as a recarburizer), brake-linings for vehicles and lubricants.

Natural and synthetic graphite industries operate independently and have little crossover in market share and end-uses.

Natural graphite supply

Natural graphite production was 1.1m tonnes worldwide in 2012. Of this total, flake accounted for 55%, amorphous 44% and vein 1%.

The dominance of Chinese production is the main talking point in the industry. China accounted for 79% of total world output followed by Brazil, India, North Korea and Canada. Smaller levels of production are also seen in Norway, Zimbabwe, Madagascar, Russia, Ukraine and Germany.

The natural graphite industry is going through a corrective phase following over two decades of no new supply coming on-stream.

China is focusing on controlling its sprawling domestic graphite industry and improving pollution levels and mining practices. At the same time a macro-economic push to move from lower value exports to producing value added products is expected to see less graphite concentrate destined for export and higher production of downstream products such as spherical graphite and battery anode materials.

The 2011 exploration boom

The emergence of electric vehicles (EV) and the potential boom in lithium-ion battery demand has buoyed interest in graphite’s role as a major battery raw material. This led to an exploration boom between 2011 and 2012 which saw over 70 new companies being established, predominately focused on exploration in Canada.

Towards the end of 2012, the rush slowed as investment from the capital markets dried up.

Major graphite producer highlights

Nacional de Grafite, Brazil
Timcal Ltd, Canada
Skaland Graphite
• Grafitbergbau Kaiserberg, Austria
• Tirupati Carbons, India
• Agrawal Graphite Industries, India
• Tamin, India

Major graphite processors

Asbury Carbons
Superior Graphite

Graphite exploration company highlights

Northern Graphite, Canada
Focus Graphite, Canada
Ontario Graphite, Canada
Energizer Resources, Madagascar
Syrah Resources, Mozambique
Standard Graphite, Canada
• 
Talga Resources, Sweden
Graphite One, Canada

To add your company to this list please email us