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Magnesia

Latest News

  • Price Briefing 15 – 21 May

    Friday, 22 May 2015

    Magnesia industry gloomy on China; Australian zircon industry optimistic for price rises.

  • MagMin 2015: Tokyo Olympics to boost Japanese magnesia demand

    Wednesday, 20 May 2015

    Japanese magnesia producer Ube Materials said it is expecting strong demand for magnesia from the construction industry over the next five years, as Japan’s capital city gears up to host the Olympics in 2020. This means Japan’s reliance on Chinese magnesia imports is unlikely to decline significantly in the next five years.

  • MagMin 2015: New spot trading centre to aid development of Chinese magnesia industry

    Wednesday, 20 May 2015

    The establishment of a magnesia trading platform in Liaoning last year aims to help regulate and mature China’s magnesia business and its pricing, although its strategy remains unclear and the dubious efficacy of similar Chinese bourses for rare earths and graphite pose tough questions for the scheme.

  • MagMin 2015: China to curtail “wasteful” magnesite mining

    Wednesday, 20 May 2015

    A mounting glut of magnesia products and the destruction of valuable mineral reserves for little or no profit has forced the Chinese government to intervene in its domestic magnesia industry in an effort to halt the rapid erosion of the market.

More from Latest News

Pricing News

  • Price Briefing 15 – 21 May

    Friday, 22 May 2015

    Magnesia industry gloomy on China; Australian zircon industry optimistic for price rises.

  • MagMin 2015: Tokyo Olympics to boost Japanese magnesia demand

    Wednesday, 20 May 2015

    Japanese magnesia producer Ube Materials said it is expecting strong demand for magnesia from the construction industry over the next five years, as Japan’s capital city gears up to host the Olympics in 2020. This means Japan’s reliance on Chinese magnesia imports is unlikely to decline significantly in the next five years.

  • MagMin 2015: New spot trading centre to aid development of Chinese magnesia industry

    Wednesday, 20 May 2015

    The establishment of a magnesia trading platform in Liaoning last year aims to help regulate and mature China’s magnesia business and its pricing, although its strategy remains unclear and the dubious efficacy of similar Chinese bourses for rare earths and graphite pose tough questions for the scheme.

  • MagMin 2015: China to curtail “wasteful” magnesite mining

    Wednesday, 20 May 2015

    A mounting glut of magnesia products and the destruction of valuable mineral reserves for little or no profit has forced the Chinese government to intervene in its domestic magnesia industry in an effort to halt the rapid erosion of the market.

More from Pricing News

Features

  • Flame retardants continue to fire demand for MDH

    Tuesday, 28 April 2015

    Modest end market growth and the gradual appearance of new competitor products for magnesium hydroxide-based fire safety solutions are unlikely to scupper the expansion of this market before 2019, IM discovers.

  • Relative positioning: Magnesia producers adjust to new industry conditions

    Monday, 27 April 2015

    With declining refractories consumption in key consuming sectors like steel and cement manufacturing, the balance of supply against demand is worrying many in the magnesia industry. Josie Shillito, Reporter, looks at the global trading picture and examines how magnesia companies are shifting their positions to adjust to new market dynamics.

  • New projects set to boost Russian magnesia production

    Monday, 27 April 2015

    Russia has historically depended on imports of magnesia for its refractories and other downstream industries, but the development of new projects in Siberia, the Far East and potentially North Korea could see the country become a net exporter of the mineral by 2020, Vladislav Vorotnikov, reveals.

  • The silent treatment: How minerals are giving water a new lease of life

    Monday, 27 April 2015

    With around 2m tonnes of sewage, industrial and agricultural waste discharged into the world’s waterways every day, it is crucial that wastewater is treated thoroughly. Liz Gyekye, Chief Reporter, examines how minerals form a key part of many wastewater treatment systems.

More from Features

Market Brief

Magnesia is the term for magnesium oxide (formula: MgO). Magnesia is produced by mining and processing mainly the hard rock mineral, magnesite, which occurs in two main forms: cryptocrystalline and crystalline.

 

Rarely, magnesia may be produced from other hard rock minerals such as dolomite, brucite, huntite, and serpentinite.

 

Another commercially important source of magnesia is from chemical processing of seawater and magnesia-rich brines, which produces what is sometimes referred to as synthetic magnesia.

 

Grades produced include:

·         Crude magnesite

·         Caustic calcined magnesia (CCM)

·         Dead burned magnesia (DBM)

·         Fused magnesia (FM)

·         Magnesium compounds derived from CCM, eg. magnesium hydroxide, magnesium sulphate.

 

The source of the magnesia determines critical chemical and physical characteristics of the derived magnesia, such as MgO purity (ranges low to high, 85%-99% MgO), ratio of CaO:SiO2, bulk density, and magnesia crystal size.

 

Supply

The world’s total resource of magnesite, the main source of magnesia, is about 13bn tonnes. Six countries host 92% of this, in descending order: China (26%), North Korea (23%), Russia (21%), Slovakia (10%), Australia (7%), and Brazil (5%).

 

World magnesia production (derived from the magnesite) is about 8.5m. tpa, and is dominated by China (49%). Other leading producers include Austria, Brazil, Greece, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, and Turkey.

 

World synthetic  magnesia production (derived from seawater, brines) is about 925,000 tpa, from Brazil, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Republic of Ireland, Russia, South Korea, and the USA.

 

Leading magnesia producers include:

Grecian Magnesite – Greece

Houying Group – China

Kumas-Kuthaya Magnesite Works Corp. – Turkey

Magnesita Refratarios – Brazil

Magnezit Group – Russia

Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties – USA

Nedmag Industries Mining & Manufacturing – Netherlands

Queensland Magnesia – Australia

SMZ Jelsava – Slovakia

Ube Material Industries – Japan

 

Markets

Each end use requires different specifications of the preferred magnesia form, so there are many different grades of magnesia on the market. Certain magnesite deposits are better suited to produce certain magnesia grades than others.

 

Crude magnesite: agriculture, glass and ceramics.

 

CCM: agriculture; environment; cement; abrasive binder; pulp and paper; fillers; feedstock for DBM, FM, and magnesium compound production.

 

DBM: refractories.

 

FM: refractories; steel coatings; ceramics.