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Magnesia

Latest News

  • Price briefing 15–21 September

    Friday, 22 September 2017

    Chinese fused magnesia prices hit all-time high; a ban on sales of explosives propel bauxite prices; brown fused alumina hit two-year high; iodine rises as consumers stock up; lithium prices held firm

  • Morgan develops extra-large crucibles

    Thursday, 21 September 2017

    The crucibles will have a capacity of 3 tonnes of molten metal, which can be increased up to 10 tonnes for specific melting requirements.

  • Tata Steel, ThyssenKrupp sign MoU for EU joint venture

    Thursday, 21 September 2017

    The proposed merger would lead to the creation of Europe's second-largest steelmaker.

  • Chinese fused magnesia prices reach new high

    Wednesday, 20 September 2017

    Supply constrains in the Chinese magnesia market on the back of the draconian environmental laws and the uncertainty associated with perceived consolidation has pushed fused magnesia prices to new high.

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Pricing News

  • Price briefing 15–21 September

    Friday, 22 September 2017

    Chinese fused magnesia prices hit all-time high; a ban on sales of explosives propel bauxite prices; brown fused alumina hit two-year high; iodine rises as consumers stock up; lithium prices held firm

  • Brown fused alumina prices hit two-year high

    Friday, 22 September 2017

    Brown fused alumina spot prices continue to climb higher as the environmental inspections show no sign of abating in China, while white fused alumina is supported by raw material cost increases.

  • Lithium prices firm as Europe, US catch up with China

    Friday, 22 September 2017

    Lithium prices in China remain firm while European and US markets spot prices start catching up. Lithium carbonate supply remains problematic while new energy vehicles production and sale rates in China remain strong.

  • Chinese bauxite price rocket higher on explosives ban

    Friday, 22 September 2017

    A looming mining curtailment due to an explosive sale ban in China has propelled spot bauxite prices higher. Supply uncertainty is set to continue over the coming months as Beijing continues its anti-pollution crusade.

More from Pricing News

Features

  • A rock and a hard place

    Friday, 08 September 2017

    Demand for refractory products is evolving, forcing suppliers to upgrade their offers and processes to stay ahead of the game, while Chinese-origin raw materials are appreciating on the back of supply shortages, making productions costlier, Davide Ghilotti, IM Chief Reporter, finds.

  • Flame tamers: Brucite, huntite and hydromagnesite

    Friday, 08 September 2017

    Magnesium minerals boast several unique properties which make them superlative flame retardants, but as Ian Wilson, Consultant*, explains, despite their wide application many of these minerals are only recovered in a handful of places across the world.

  • Not a Cinderella story: Half a century of Industrial Minerals

    Friday, 08 September 2017

    Long dismissed as the Cinderella of the commodities world, industrial minerals were regarded as high bulk, low value for most outside the network which makes up our world. But after 50 years IM is looking forward to a glittering future - and so are those at the top of the industrial minerals tree, interviewed in turn about the changing face of the industry.

  • Life after steel: Is there more for magnesia?

    Monday, 03 April 2017

    The global steel industry may have taken a turn for the better, but refractory magnesia continues to face oversupply. Cameron Perks, IM Correspondent, looks at why the decline of magnesia’s largest end market is failing to deter new entrants to the sector.

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Market Brief

Magnesia is the term for magnesium oxide (formula: MgO). Magnesia is produced by mining and processing mainly the hard rock mineral, magnesite, which occurs in two main forms: cryptocrystalline and crystalline.

 

Rarely, magnesia may be produced from other hard rock minerals such as dolomite, brucite, huntite, and serpentinite.

 

Another commercially important source of magnesia is from chemical processing of seawater and magnesia-rich brines, which produces what is sometimes referred to as synthetic magnesia.

 

Grades produced include:

·         Crude magnesite

·         Caustic calcined magnesia (CCM)

·         Dead burned magnesia (DBM)

·         Fused magnesia (FM)

·         Magnesium compounds derived from CCM, eg. magnesium hydroxide, magnesium sulphate.

 

The source of the magnesia determines critical chemical and physical characteristics of the derived magnesia, such as MgO purity (ranges low to high, 85%-99% MgO), ratio of CaO:SiO2, bulk density, and magnesia crystal size.

 

Supply

The world’s total resource of magnesite, the main source of magnesia, is about 13bn tonnes. Six countries host 92% of this, in descending order: China (26%), North Korea (23%), Russia (21%), Slovakia (10%), Australia (7%), and Brazil (5%).

 

World magnesia production (derived from the magnesite) is about 8.5m. tpa, and is dominated by China (49%). Other leading producers include Austria, Brazil, Greece, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, and Turkey.

 

World synthetic  magnesia production (derived from seawater, brines) is about 925,000 tpa, from Brazil, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Republic of Ireland, Russia, South Korea, and the USA.

 

Leading magnesia producers include:

Grecian Magnesite – Greece

Houying Group – China

Kumas-Kuthaya Magnesite Works Corp. – Turkey

Magnesita Refratarios – Brazil

Magnezit Group – Russia

Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties – USA

Nedmag Industries Mining & Manufacturing – Netherlands

Queensland Magnesia – Australia

SMZ Jelsava – Slovakia

Ube Material Industries – Japan

 

Markets

Each end use requires different specifications of the preferred magnesia form, so there are many different grades of magnesia on the market. Certain magnesite deposits are better suited to produce certain magnesia grades than others.

 

Crude magnesite: agriculture, glass and ceramics.

 

CCM: agriculture; environment; cement; abrasive binder; pulp and paper; fillers; feedstock for DBM, FM, and magnesium compound production.

 

DBM: refractories.

 

FM: refractories; steel coatings; ceramics.